Victim Memorials

 

 

This is the heart and soul of NOVJL:  the true stories of lives so cruelly taken, and crimes so horrifically committed, that they must be told if there is to be any hope for understanding of this difficult issue. Links to individual victim memorial pages can be found by state below, grouped by the state where the victims were murdered.

 

Please help us find others. You may add a victim to our memorials by filling out the form below and submitting it.  You will be contacted at the email address you provided for a photo as soon as we receive  your request. When reading these stories of our murdered loved ones, and know that . . . There are hundreds more . . . Names we do not know and are not being told, even though millions of dollars have been spent to name, identify, and communicate with and for their murderers.  The precious lives of these Victims – lost to those who choose to commit murder – causes more damage than most people can ever measure or understand.  These murders have left catastrophe in their wake, and have ramifications that cause damage for a lifetime. And the toll is not just on the family and friends – it has staggering costs for all in our society. 

For years and years and years after the first act of horror  – the killing continues to exact its toll.   A toll too large to measure.  We can only work with our every breath to remember and honor them by working to make sure no one else has to go through what we have gone through.  We want to give no more place to their murderers in our lives.   They have lost the right to walk among us. We beg the leaders of our nation to give us, at the very least, legal finality in these cases.  We have been through the trials, the agony, and we deserve, at the very least, not to endure any more torture. We want them to serve out their life in prison sentences, permanently and anonymously. Some of us are praying that these offenders grow to learn to be better human beings, and that they dedicate their lives to helping others, from where they are, working to make restitution to their victims and to society. Being sorry is not enough. They can still save their souls. They can and should work to redeem these tragedies, as we also work to redeem these tragedies.  But all this they can do while they serve their sentences. For even in prison they get to live, love, learn, laugh, be with family, and experience pleasure and joy.  The killers owe all of us the rest of their lives. Our loved ones are gone forever. The generations that would have come from them are gone forever. All that they would have accomplished in their lives is gone forever. All the ways they would have touched and shaped the world and people around them is gone forever. The love and light they added to the world is gone forever. Our hearts are broken forever.

Victim Memorials 

States A-D     F-M     N-R     S-W

 

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18 Responses to Victim Memorials

  1. jbjenkins says:

    We invite all readers of these memorial pages to leave their messages of support and thoughts about these murders for the victims families to read and cherish. Thank you for your support.

  2. Susan Snediker says:

    Nancy Bishop Langert was a school/church mate of mine. Her parents and family are well-known throughout our village as a kind and loving family. In 1990, Nancy and her husband, Richard, were expecting their first baby when a local teen, 17-year old, David Biro, under what surely were illusions of grandeur, not to mention, insanity, calculatingly broke into their condo, and lying in wait, shot them, ending all three of their lives. Biro had even gone to their funeral, and bragged casually about the cold-blooded killing to friends later on.
    He was sentenced to life without parole and sits in an Illinois prison today.
    Some people might say he was, ” just a child”, when he committed this heinous crime. Some say that the teenage brain doesn’t fully mature until sometime in the early twenties.
    Some even say he was mentally-ill and therefore was a victim of his own device.
    All three are true, and all three have absolutely nothing to do with the cold and calculated way in which this killer took the lives of three innocent people off of this earth and the simple fact that he did.
    The Bishop and Langert families have been to hell and back. They were robbed of their inherent right to love, enjoy, and grow old with Nancy, Richard and their unborn child. They had their devastating days in court. They were dogged by the media, who were desperately looking for a “Hollywood-Movie-Of-The-Week” type spin to this crime. They endured a funeral and a burial with the finality of knowing that in the blink of an eye, the; sister, brother, son, daughter, grandchild, niece or nephew, they loved, were gone forever. Each of them faces some sort of “anniversary-of ” during the year when it comes to birthdays missed, or holidays never spent with. And of course the perpetual, “D-Date”. The forever death date of their beloved.

    David Biro can eat and sleep. He can read and watch TV. He can communicate with his family and breathe and turn his face to the sun, or not. He has opti0ns.
    The Langerts, do not.
    Their right to life was taken the moment this killer decided to end their lives.

    To allow this criminal the opportunity to qualify for parole under the guise that he was a juvenile when he committed this crime, is unequivocally wrong. Biro murdered three innocent people; that is a fact. He slowly planned the murders and then sat back and watched their grief-stricken families and friends as they numbingly faced their days and lives without their loved ones by their sides.
    To ask the victims’ families to face a yearly parole hearing is like asking them to relive each and every painful moment of the past. To ask them to then have to face the killer, listening to him plead his case, and spend precious time and energy trying to figure out why in the world anyone would ever consider letting this monster go free, when the facts are what they are, is ludicrous. David Biro is a psychotic, cold-blooded, killer. He was found guilty of the crimes he committed and sentenced justly.
    The fact also, that he was a juvenile when he committed these crimes, should not ever have any connection whatsoever, to his crime.

    • BDLILLY says:

      that bastard deserves no mercy. to rob others of their rights is unjust so rot in hell you ungrateful ass..

    • Joe says:

      MY NAME IS JOSE VASQUEZ IM AN OLDER BROTHER OF TAYDE VASQUEZ  WHO WAS SHOT AND KILLED IN 1992. I KNOW EVERYBODYS PAIN WHO LOST A LOVE ONE. ELIZABETH LOZANO TOOK MY LITTLE SISTERS LIFE AND NOW AFTER 17 YEARS SHES LOOKING FOR ANYWAY OUT OF PRISON. JUST LIKE SHE DID WHEN SHE GOT ARRESTED IN 1992. SOME PEOPLE WANT TO BELIEVE THAT AT 16YEARS OLD ALMOST 17. THEY DONT KNOW WHAT THEY ARE DOING. ELIZABETH LOZANO CONNED A FEW DETECTIVES THE DAY SHE WAS ARRESTED AND MANAGED TO BE SET FREE TO ONLY FLEE TO MEXICO. HOW SMART IS THAT. YOU EVER HEAR OF A 16 ALMOST 17 YEAR OLD GET AWAY FROM THE HANDS OF DETECTIVES AT THE POLICE STATION AFTER BEEN PICKED UP FOR MURDER?
      WELL ELIZABETH LOZANO DID IT. CAN MY LITTLE SISTER  TAYDE GET A SECOND CHANCE AT LIFE? NO CAN SHE PAROLE FROM THE GRAVE AND BE WITH HER LOVE ONES? NO. UNTILL  YOU LOOSE A LOVED ONE THE WAY WE HAVE YOULL UNDERSTAND THAT THE PAIN NEVER GOES AWAY AND YOU WONT APPROVE THIERE CHANCE FOR PAROLE.IM SORRY FOR EVERYONE LOST. HERES ELIZABETH LOZANO SHOWING THE WORD HER ASS FROM PRISON AND HOW SHE IS SUFFERING

      • Wow, Jose, this photo of your sister’s killer from prison, posing like this is a REAL shocker. Normally we “edit” out bad words on our site, but we are leaving yours up here because we are pretty stunned at this ourselves. I know that when prisoners get visitors they can take pictures of them, but how in the world did THIS picture happen in a prison?! Our arms are around you and all of Tayde’s loved ones.

  3. jbjenkins says:

    Thank you Susan, for this caring support! One note – the offender was not mentally ill in any way. Sociopath, yes. But in full possession of his mental faculties.

  4. George says:

    I found your site because I was searching about a case I was familiar with many years ago. I was surprised to see the individual who committed such a crime on another site as well looking for support. The person I am refering to is Stephen Sneade who committed murder while he was 16 years old in Brunswick County Virgina.
    I know the case personally. I know the people involved and I am just amazed by those who are looking to help him to be free one day. I do not care how old he was when he committed the crime. Truth is many teenagers commit such horrible crimes because they feel they will get off easy because of their age. Stephen Sneade knew what he was doing that day. He drove far from his own area where he was hoping no one knew him. He walked into the store with a gun and he killed someone.
    Why should he be allowed free? He took a life. His should be taken from him. Do the victims get parole? The victims and their familes were given a life sentence.
    Many would choose prison over death. Stephen Sneade, while in prison, still gets to live. He still gets to see and speak to his family. He still gets to see what becomes of the world etc…. His victim has none of that. His Victim’s family has to live the rest of their lives without a loved one. They also have to live with the fear and how his actions effected their life forever. Stephen Sneade thought of no one but himself that day. His actions destroyed many lives. Even his own families. I remember seeing his mother. I felt so bad for her. She was destroyed by this. I remember her crying at the court house. Even her life will never be the same again. Those who would ever suggest that Juvenile offenders should all be freed one day are either family members of the convicted or know nothing about the destruction these youths have caused. I even find it very hard to believe that some of these familes cannot see what their loved one has done. Even they do not want to see the REAL victim but want to act as if their child in prison is the victim. If you take a life you deserve to have yours taken. Plain and simple. I do not mean that in death. But why should you live a free life when someone else cannot due to what you have done. To Stephen Sneade. You got what you deserved. Honestly I think you got off easy. You have no remourse for what you did. I see all over the internet how you have been trying to get out using technicalities as “I was not read my miranda rights, boo hoo hoo”.
    You took a life. You destroyed families including your own. You deserve to rot your days away where you.

  5. George says:

    I wanted to add something to this. I have read many articles where organizations are trying to support early release for Teen Offenders.
    One of the main arguments always given is that at their age they do not understand the crime and the punishment of the crime that they have committed.

    I was born in New york and moved to a small town in Virgina when I was a teenager. Big difference from what I was use to. One of the differences was almost everyone I knew in VA owned a gun of some sort. Hunting was a big thing and many wanted to collect guns.

    Since so many had and collected guns the local police station would hold a gun safety coarse. One of the things they taught was how to keep your family and children safe with a gun in the house.
    I remeber watching this coarse and parents were told to bring their children on one particular day.
    The officer gave a demistration. He called up several children around the ages of 5 and 6.
    The officer layed a toy gun out on the table and told the children they could touch and play with the toy.
    Reaction was different based on shyness of the children however none were afraid to pick it up. Some even started to play with it and make firing noises.

    The officer then placed a real gun on the table (not loaded). He did not say it was real nor that it was a toy.
    This time the childrens reation was different. They were not so quick to touch it but you could see the curiosity brewing in their minds.
    They first looked at it. Then it was as if it was a hot plate and they simply stuck their finger out to make a quick touch. After a moment some of the childrens curiosity got the better of them and they picked it up.
    Next the officer took the gun away and placed another on the table. This time he told the children it was real.
    Not one child wanted to touch the gun or go near it. Some ran back to their parents. But the look of fear was in all of their eyes.

    The point the officer wanted to make to the parents was, most accidents happen because the parents do not talk to their children about guns. Most parents think the way to protect the child is to not let them know a gun is in the house and just hide it.
    He showed parents what a curious child would do. He then showed them the difference when the child was informed the gun was real.

    I learned something else from that day. I also learned that even at such a young age those children still knew what a real gun was and the power it has to hurt and take a life. This is the reason none wanted to be anywhere near it.
    If these young children already understand this then so do teenagers.

    When I was first out of high school I got a job with a local dollar store stocking.
    We were famous for the local kids to come into the store right after school. A big problem the store had was the children shoplifting. I would say on average the ages were 10 to 13 years old.
    A child acts differently then an adult when it comes to getting caught.
    If an adult is caught they pretty much know nothing will happen to them for stealing a candy bar. While it is embarrassing they know they are not going to do time in jail for it. At worse they will get a fine.
    A child however is completely different. From the many children we caught I have not seen one who was not terrified, shaking, crying etc…
    We did not do anything to the children. We let them know what they did was wrong and would have them call their parents to pick them up. We never called the police. As mentioned it was usually just candy they took.
    But the store manager was hoping to teach them a lesson. He would give them the option of calling their parents (which is option they chose) or the store could call the police (even thought they would not).
    In these childrens minds they would be locked up for life for stealing a candy bar.
    Many cried they did not want to go to prison and said how sorry they were. They were also terrified about calling their parents.
    Another lesson I learned from this is that children do know the difference between right and wrong. They do understand punishment. In fact children believe in much more serious punishments then adults. Every child thought they would go to jail for stealing a candy bar if we had called the police.

    Through those two experiences I have learned that children do understand. That they do know right from wrong, and that they do know committing a crime comes with a punishment.
    I knew these things when I was a child.
    Why is it then that many want to say children do not understand? Even they understood when they were a child.
    These teens who killed knew what they were doing and they certainly knew they would go to prison.
    The case I know the teen planned his crime. He designed a plan in such detail to avoid being caught.
    The fact he made such a detail plan says he understood completely what he was doing was wrong and he would go to prision. For that he should not be treated as a child.

  6. Amanda vanbogelen says:

    when i was 7 yrs old… my brother was 12… our father was violently stabbed to death in my small little town in Michigan. by a guy and a girl…and a horrible night of them beating him so badly we almost couldn’t have an open casket … they stabbed him 9 times in the heart … Amy black was 16 and was tried as adult and got life with no parole.. her accomplice was Jeffrey Abrahamson he to go life with no parole he was 20. I have just riecently learned they r trying to change the laws so she gets a chance to get out…. she told the judge she wanted to know what it felt like to kill someone and get away with it…. I want to join in the fight to keep killers in jail !!!!! I can’t believe this is even a debate I had to live the past 21 years with out my daddy and no one to walk me down the aisle next year at my wedding that bitch should rot in there forever!!

  7. Keri chavez says:

    I lost my cousin oct 28 1998 to being killed by her friend and a group of them. Most ofvthem was released after very little time. I struggle with depression cause each one of my fsmily members was hit differently and had to deal with my own issues. But still the best way i can deal with it is tell the stroy of her life and make sure she is never forgotten….

    • Keri we are so sorry for this devastating tragedy in your family and no one that has not suffered this kind of trauma can know how life changing and permanently awful it is. We all get this- it’s why we formed NOVJM- of which you are now a part. Please email us your contact information to be placed on our membership list to NOVJM@aol.com. And send us your cousins photo and any bio you wish so we can make a memorial page for her. Finally, your commitment to tell her story and keep her memory alive is a powerful one- good for you! Please make sure you talk to a professional about your own health, as so many of us have had to do, because you must take care of yourself so you can carry on for your cousin for a long time to come. Hugs of support! Please join our NOVJM Facebook group as well. We look forward to working with you.

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